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Certified Workers’ Compensation Specialist*
AS AUTHORIZED BY THE PA SUPREME COURT

Certified Workers’ Compensation Specialist*
AS AUTHORIZED BY THE PA SUPREME COURT

Those working from home can file a worker’s comp claim

On Behalf of | Aug 23, 2021 | Firm News

Many of us have been working from home for some time. While some companies have returned or announced returns to the office, others still allow their employees to work from home. For some, this is great — many enjoy not commuting to work, dressing in their work clothes, being available when their children need something.

Telecommuters can still get injured while working from home, perhaps tripping over a power cord or falling on the stairs. Fortunately, Pennsylvania requires most employers to provide workers’ compensation to workers on the clock even when working in their house. Moreover, the employer must offer supplies that enable the worker to accomplish their work safely and effectively.

Proving it’s a work-related injury

Worker’s compensation is for employees injured while on the clock. So, workers will need proof that they were injured while working and performing tasks that are a regular part of their job description. It is essential to document the injury just as they would if working on-site, so the following steps will be crucial:

  1. Reporting the injury to a manager as soon as possible
  2. Getting medical help for treatment and documentation of the injury
  3. Filing a claim as quickly as possible
  4. Providing all necessary information
  5. Keeping thorough records of the injury, treatment and paperwork

It is also wise to avoid the temptation of returning to work too soon. The employer may argue that it is easy to start again because the worker is already at home, but this can lead to more serious medical problems. It is best to wait until cleared by a medical professional.

Filing for benefits may not be easy

It is easy to provide incomplete documentation or improperly fill out the paperwork, leading to a delay or denial. This may necessitate appealing the initial decision.